Vintage Embalming Fluid Catalog Scan

Vintage Embalming Fluid Catalog Scan

Includes Embalming Catalog Translation

I recently purchased a vintage embalming catalog, but it was falling apart and difficult to read. I decided to scan each page and translate through free online OCR (Relatively Accurate). Enjoy!

 

30 pages total, to keep the load time down I separated between 5 pages, arrows to continue are at the bottom.

 

Page1

 

Page2

STERILOL—I

An Arterial fluid—for bleaching jaundice,
for dropsy, tissue gas, floaters, septi”
caemia and badly decomposed cases.

.I
A Post Mortem fluid—for arteries, viscera, I

direct application in open cavities,
bleaching and hypodermic.

Elhernal Bleacher—just saturate a cloth with
it and bleach the skin.

Hypodermic fluid—to reach spots without I
circulation.

Instant Deodorant—Will stop the worst cann
cer odors at once.

A Cavity fluid above all—searches out gas ‘
pockets, neutralizing, disinfecting, pre’
serving. Penetrates lung tissues in 45

minutes.

Page3

Get it now, save the

bad cases, save worry
and save money.

You Can Do

Better Embalming
with S terilol
Send For It Now

Per case of 24 bottles,
$25.00

” C‘b. Ghieago, [1141,8512 .

l . a…» Mh‘nm ‘
I

Page 2-3\

An Arterial fluid—for bleaching jaundice,

caemia and badly decomposed cases.

A Post Mortem fluid—for arteries, viscera,
direct application in open cavities,
bleaching and hypodermic.

Enema] Bleacher—just saturate a cloth with
it and bleach the skin.

Hypodermic fluid—to reach spots without
circulation.

Instant Deodorant—Will stop the worst can’
cer odors at once.

A Cavity fluid above all—searches out gas
pockets, neutralizing, disinfecting, prer
serving. Penetrates lung tissues in 45
minutes. ‘

sy, tissue gas, floaters, septir’

Undertakers Supply *

TripleBase,Sextuple Quality

Get it now, save the
bad cases, save worry
and save money.

You Can Do
Better Embalming
with Sterilol
Send For It Now

Per case of 24 bottles,
$25.00

Page4

HEMOSOL AND ITS VALUE
IN EMBALMING

CHAPTER I.

The Progress of Embalming.—Reasons for Using
Hemosol

MBALMING in America has passed through several periods
of progress since it was first practiced in a very crude way
during the war between the states from 1861 to 1865. At first
it was only a matter of preserving the bodies of certain oflicers
that they might be sent home to their relatives for interment in
the regular family cemetery. In this effort the crudest of materials
were used, and the end sought was entirely foreign to all notion
of cosmetics. It was only with the thought that the body should
be prevented from undergoing putrefactive change, and that it
should not become an utter impossibility to transport the body
because of its oflensivenehs. The limited number of embalmings
that were done over a period of several years immediately follow’
ing the Civil War period were similarly done.

After a few years there came a demand for better cosmetics,
and out of this demand ,came the fluids that many embalmers
remember so well. These fluids contained many chemicals that
belong to the list of metallic poisons which are prohibited today
because of their covering traces of crime and suicides. Legal
medicine demanded the discontinuance of these poisons, and the
embalmer was forced to turn to some other chemical as a base
upon which to build embalming fluids.

At this time there came into the field a chemical that had been,
up to this time too expensive to be considered in the manufacture
of embalming fluids. A cheaper method of manufacture had
been discovered and now formaldehyde was obtainable at a cost
that brought it into common use as a base chemical upon which

‘ we might build fluids for embalming. The one great objection

to formaldehyde was that it so destroyed cosmetics that it was
but little better than the old chemicals employed in embalming
in that day before cosmetics were considered. We are to this
day depending in large measure upon this same chemical as a base
form fluids, and in the effort to produce more sat! ‘ _

4

Page5

isfactory cosmetics we have attempted to produce controlling
chemicals that we may either combine with the regular fluid or
that we may send in advance of the regular fluid, and in this
manner so mellow and control the formaldehyde action as to
enable us to produce results that will be proper from the stand
point of cosmetics as well as from the standpoint of disinfection
and preservation of tissue.

While we have been successful in adding controlling chemicals
to fluid formulas, manufacturers have never been satisfied with
the degree of control that is possible from this point of operation.
It has been generally known and conceded that we must depend
upon something that will be sent in advance of the regular fluid
to drive out the engorged blood and prepare the system for the
embalming fluid which will follow. In the early effort along this
line, compounds of chemicals were offered that were calculated to
mix with the blood in the circulatory system and change its col’
oring and also change its chemical nature to the extent that it
would either flow out readily or would not be harmful should it
for any cause not flow out. For a time this theory seemed plausv
ible and the embalming profession was favorably impressed. As
the rank and file of the profession became better’ educated and
able to reason along scientific lines, it became apparent that the
injection of any chemical combination, regardless of the degree
to which it is a solvent, against the end of a fibrin blood clot in
the circulatory system, could not possibly end in a dissolving of
the entire clot or succession of clats. To allow time suficient
for such a chemical fact would be to demand many times more

hours than usually intervene between death and the funeral. Emv‘

balmers have generally come to regard the possibility to mix
chemicals with blood which has undergone any degree of disso’
lution as an impossibility, and have ceased to expect to attain
any such result.

Modern embalmers do not expect the results formerly claimed
for the so’called blood solvents. They do expect that certain
chemical combinations may prevent further blood coagulation,
that if possible to dilate the circulatory system suficiently to pass
around a clot, it may succeed in breaking the clot down sufiv
ciently to produce sections small enough to pass out through the
drain tubes. But the one thing modern embalmers demand and
have a right to demand is a chemical combination that will assist

them in removing the blood volume from the body. They realise
that the only logical place for blood after death is outside-Ill:

5 l ‘

There are more scanned pages ahead

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